Food peddlers

food.jpg

I used to live along a very interesting street that begins from the T junction and ends at an intersection.

foodpeddler-21.jpg

In the early days, food peddlers on bicycles or motorbikes that were converted to moveable food stalls, ply this street in the morning or late at night. With their rubber honk and bells that goes clink!clink! we have the roti man on their overloaded bicycle; the chui kueh seller with his steamer;  the kueh-mueh Ah Soh with assortments of bingka, harm chi peng, yue char keuh etc.  Later in the morning, the meat and vegetable seller comes a-calling. Then in the hot afternoon, the ice-cream and the ice bola seller knows how to quench our thirst.   Oh, not to forget the konk-konk man chiseling away piece by piece the sweet candy, and as he twirls and twirls his sticky beh leh koh on a wooden stick.   Then we catched the kacang putih man clad in his familiar sarong, balancing his wooden box-cum-table atop his turban head, like the acrobat doing their act in the circus.

In the evening,  we wait patiently with bowl or plate in hand along the street,  for the wan tan mee seller and later in the night, the kueh teuy man. They never disappoint us. Dieting was never an issue. At precisely the same time every night, these two peddlers will pass by this stretch of street. If you missed them going down the street, not to worry. You can catch them coming back the same way once they complete a full circle.  Unlike hanging out at mamak shops for teh tarik and play catch-up, we sit by the side of the road under the street lamp , yaking the night away with  ghosts and orang minyak stories.  

One day the kuey teuy seller stopped coming. We told him one day he’s going to meet a beautiful ghost if he goes back so late everynight. So each time he passes by that mangosteen and banana trees after 12 midnight, all is quiet and eerie, we heard he peddaled for his life. So when he failed to turn up after that, we thought he met his ghost.

Further up the street, near a railway track, we heard a rock was shooting out water with healing powers.  News of this sort caught the attention of the media. People with asthma, skin disease and kidney problem testified to its truth. My family like every other family went to fill up our empty bottles and we drank and we were cured of sore throat, skin  rashes. My mother used this water to make cake powder that gives a cooling effect for the face. Each day the crowd swelled and got bigger. Finally the railway keeper decided to condone the area and began charging the people. Just as suddenly it came, as suddenly it stopped. Thats the end of the story!

Advertisements

About moviemania

Mission work in Kuching, Sarawak & Climbed Bako National Park, seen the largest proboscis Climbed the Great Wall of China & serenaded by Ku Nian along Yangtze River Sailed the River Nile Walked in the footsteps of Jesus, crossed River Jordan into Israel, the Holy Lands Mission work in Talugtug, Philippines Mission work in Toowoomba, Queensland Mission work in Kalaymyo, Myanmar
This entry was posted in Food. Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to Food peddlers

  1. Kenny Mah says:

    That’s a wonderful entry on food peddlers. I remember my favourite one was this putu mayam man that would come riding on his bicycle. This was when I was a kid living in Malacca.

    He used real gula Melaka, and not brown sugar (or worse, just plain white sugar) that I find more common here in the Klang Valley. It made all the difference.

    I guess one of the reasons people didn’t use to diet in the past was because they were spending more time outside moving about rather than stuck at home watching TV. (And these would be TV programs that encouraged people to diet some more.)

    The past is a fine thing indeed, but it is gone now…

  2. Firehorse says:

    Those were the good old days, now I miss my Indian man – his laksa, kuih talam and poh piah chnee.

  3. Judy Leese says:

    I love the popiah man and kueh teow ah pek. Are you talking about the same kueh teow ah pek who used to station himself for a while outside my grandpa’s Teluk Pulai house (in front of Sampah Pek’s house)? I also like the rojak man.

  4. Yee,Julie says:

    kenny, thats the problem when young man read auntie’s blog. But dont call me Auntie yeh!!! Its always the good old days….. Talking about the bygone days, there was this young chap just employed by our company.During his training outstation, he got to endure hours of “I used to ……from our Seniors, while travelling with them. When he got back each time, he got more stories to relate (actually the Senior thot’ that was part of the training hahaha..)
    FH, Judy, yes, we all love those days. The kuey teuy man probably met his “ghost” and decided to stay put in front of your grandpa’s house.

  5. Kenny Mah says:

    No lah, no Auntie Auntie here, hee hee. Seriously, all this talk of good ole fashioned food of days of yore is making me miss Malacca mucho mucho. Can’t wait to return for CNY. Reunion feast, here I come! 😀

  6. Alice says:

    Haha! That koay teow man reminds me of the boy who delivered wan tan mee to my house. The driveway to my house had some banana trees and how he scrammed past it when delivering the food. His eyes would focus on those trees. I used to tease him , “kooi lai liao!” and enjoy seeing him scoot! I wonder why ghost is said to hide behind banana trees. Any idea? Does wordpress has limited font? Hard to seelah but want to put in my comments.

  7. Yee, Julie says:

    THIS CAPS FONT IS FOR MY DEAR WONDA. YOU ALSO FROM KLANG? I THOT YOU FROM PENANG. I KNOW THE HANTU STORY THAT COMES OUT FROM BEHIND THE BANANA TREE. WILL TELL LATER.
    SORRY FOR THE SMALL PRINT IN MY BLOG. IN FUTURE I WILL TYPE IN WORD(LARGE FONT) AND PASTE INTO MY BLOG .I TRIED BUT CANT FIND ANY OPTIONS FOR LARGE FONTS IN WORDPRESS. ANYONE CAN HELP?

  8. wonda says:

    Me not from Klang. Pgite

  9. Yee, Julie says:

    wonda, thats right. im not mcc yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s